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5 basic movement patterns of resistance training

Whether you're new to training, an intermittent exerciser, or a seasoned trainee, these are the basics of training you will want to consider throughout your whole life. Regardless of primary sport or activity, goal, or abilities, these 5 basic movement patterns of resistance training are ones to include 5-ever. Of course, as you progress and get more sport specific, things may shift, but the foundational piece will remain a constant. Remember, fitness is for life. Read more about strength training benefits.



Cool down stretch

 

MOVEMENT PATTERNS

1. Squat / Knee Dominant Exercises

This movement pattern is one that can be done with several different modalities including body weight, barbell, dumbbell(s), kettlebell(s), a plate, a pack, TRX, on a box, with heels elevated, and with various ranges of motion.

 

Examples:

Back Squats, Front Squats, Goblet Squats, Lunges, Bulgarian Split Squats, Skater Squats, Pistol Squats, and Step-Ups.

 

2. Hinge / Hip Dominant Exercises

Similarly to squats, you can use various types of equipment and ranges of motion to achieve a hinge. A hinge is one of the first movement patterns I go over with my clients who are new to resistance training as it may not be as natural of a movement for some.

 

Examples:

Deadlifts, Good Mornings, RDLs, Hip Thrusts, Glute Bridges, SL Deadlifts, SL Hip Thrusts, and KB Swings.

 

3. Push / Horizontal + Vertical

Both horizontal and vertical push movements are equally as important. Although overhead movements can be tricky for some people due to shoulder mobility or past injuries, I think it's important to work with a reputable physical therapist to help you improve your mobility and allow you to move more comfortably overhead.

 

Examples:

Push-Ups, Chest Press, Shoulder Press, Push Press, Landmine Press, Incline Chest Press, Chest Fly, Dips, and Tricep Extension.

 

4. Pull / Horizontal + Vertical

Strengthening your pull movements can help with opening up your chest and improving overall posture. Pull exercises are often challenging to do without some sort of resistance, so I highly recommend accessing some form of equipment to get the most out of training in this movement pattern.

 

Examples:

Pull-Ups, Chin Ups, Lat Pull Down, Rows, Inverted Rows, Face Pulls, Bicep Curls, and Back Fly.

 

5. Carries

Carries are one of the most underrated exercises, in my opinion. Although I do feel that squats, hinges, pushes, and pulls are more important comparatively speaking, variations of carries hold a significant value in contributing to grip strength. A study was published in 2019 that suggested grip strength served as a biomarker in overall strength, bone density, mental health, and all-cause and disease-specific mortality.

 

Carries aren't the only exercise that contribute to grip strength, but these are also considered a functional exercise as it mimics movements such as carrying in groceries, pulling a suitcase, or carrying your sleepy kiddo inside.

 

Examples:

Farmer Carries, Suitcase Carries, Offset Carries, Overhead Carries, and Front Racked Carries.

 

BONUS #6: Core

You work your core in most exercises through bracing and other aspects such as rotation or anti-rotation in unilateral movements, but there is value to do core on its own, too.

 

Examples:

Planks (prone), Superman (prone), Dead Bugs (supine), Hollow Hold (supine) Wood Chops (rotation), Windmill (rotation), Side Planks (anti-rotation), and Bird Dogs (anti-rotation).

 

Each of these movement patterns will set you off to a great start to a well-rounded training regime. Learn about KATHLETICS 1:1 online programming.

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